Issues

 

 

Housing

Local control over housing and development that complies with Proposition A is a must for our city.

No oversized/high-density projects should be wedged into established residential neighborhoods. Property right of residents must be viewed as equally important as those of the developers.

New construction must maintain neighborhood character and fit in with their surroundings. Any discussions of affordable housing must include helping our senior citizens who have long lived and contributed to our community and are hardest hit by inflation and rising costs.

Growth must be based on realistic goals that take into consideration the impacts upon our city’s infrastructure and carrying capacity.  We need to join with other cities to fight for local control and reject edicts from Sacramento.

 

Public Safety

Maintain high levels of public safety and readiness while keeping in mind the number one mission of first responders; Fire, Sheriffs, and Lifeguards are to serve the public, not the mayor, council, or staff.

The city should encourage training and readiness drills on a regular basis that includes surrounding allied agencies.

Potential hazards and emergency scenarios need to be identified and advanced plans made to respond and prevent the loss of lives and property.

Response to large scale incidents, natural disasters, and pandemics should activate a preselected and trained leadership team that brings together all three public safety groups and local area hospitals.

Our first responders are the experts and should be listened to by the council and allowed to do their jobs when the extraordinary occurs.

In the event that supply chains are interrupted during a regional or statewide disaster, the city should identify and maintain necessary stocks of equipment and supplies to be cached at sites throughout the city.

 

Roads and Highway 101

Safe streets and Infrastructure are one of the prime responsibilities of government. Road use has to maintain a balance of all user groups and their requirements to safely reach their destination. This includes pedestrians and ADA access.

A good start would be reappraising speed limits, adding stop signs, and adjusting signal timing in problem areas.

Capital improvement spending must benefit a majority of residents and long-standing issues like flooding and drainage must be addressed and prioritized.

 

Government Transparency

The council should strive for more public participation and listen to the concerns of residents before reaching a decision.

Agendas should be published as early as possible to allow residents to understand and thoughtfully respond to the topics at hand.

The council should meet more often and for a shorter duration. Meetings that go beyond midnight are signs of leadership failure by the mayor and council.

Awards and proclamations should be handled by the mayor and pertinent council members during the day.

Important “hot button” topics should get their own dedicated council meetings so all voices can be heard and considered.